PresentationsAfrican and African American English

Search

To search in any category, start typing part of the entry you want, for example "Shana"or "Poplack" for "Shana Poplack", "10" for "2010", "pidgin" or "spcl" for "Society for Pidgin and Creole Linguistics".

Event: Author:
Year: Language:
Clear

Eze, Ejike, Shana Poplack & Sali Tagliamonte

Eze, Ejike, Shana Poplack & Sali Tagliamonte. 1995. Bin don com wen?: Past tense marking in Nigerian Pidgin English. SPCL 1995. New Orleans.

Fuller Medina, Nicté

Fuller Medina, Nicté. 2012. Processing versus Dialect Specific Grammars: Relativization in early African American English. CVC VI. Université du Québec à Montréal.

Harvie, Dawn

Harvie, Dawn. 1997. Null subject in English. NWAVE 26. Université Laval.

Harvie, Dawn. 2001. Null subject in African Nova Scotian English. NWAV 30. North Carolina State University.

Harvie, Dawn & Gunnel Tottie

Harvie, Dawn & Gunnel Tottie. 1998. It’s all relative: relativization strategies in African American English. CLA 1998. University of Ottawa.

Howe, Darin

Howe, Darin. 1995. Negative concord in early Black English. NWAVE 24. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Howe, Darin. 1997. Negation and the history of African American English. NWAVE 26 (Symposium on Objectivity and Commitment in the Study of Early Black English). Université Laval. (Presented by James A. Walker).

Meechan, Marjory & James A. Walker

Meechan, Marjory & James A. Walker. 1998. The decreolization of Canadian English: copula contraction and prosody. CLA 1998. University of Ottawa.

Poplack, Shana, William Labov & Maciej Baranowski

Poplack, Shana, William Labov & Maciej Baranowski. 2004. New light on the expatriate southern community. LAVIS III. University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa.

Poplack, Shana & Sali Tagliamonte

Poplack, Shana & Sali Tagliamonte. 1986. Aspects of the verbal system in Samaná English. Workshop on Creole languages in Time, Space and Society. LSA Institute.

Poplack, Shana & Sali Tagliamonte. 1986. Tense and aspect in Samaná English. SCL 6. University of the West Indies.

Poplack, Shana & Sali Tagliamonte. 1992. -S or nothing: marking the plural in the African American Diaspora. NWAVE 21. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Poplack, Shana & Sali Tagliamonte. 1992. Plural marking in early Black English. CLA 1992. University of Prince Edward Island.

Poplack, Shana & Sali Tagliamonte. 1995. It’s black and white: the future of English in rural Nova Scotia. NWAVE 24. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Poplack, Shana & Sali Tagliamonte. 1995. Nothing in context: Marking the past in Nigerian Pidgin English. CLA 1995. Université de Montréal.

Tagliamonte, Sali

Tagliamonte, Sali. 1997. Ain’t no suffix like -s. NWAVE 26 (Symposium on Objectivity and Commitment in the Study of Early Black English). Université Laval.

Tagliamonte, Sali. 1997. The story of KOM in Nigerian Pidgin English. SPCL 1997. Chicago.

Tagliamonte, Sali. 1997. Change and continuity in the PRESENT PERFECT: the view from an enclave. ICHL 13. Düsseldorf, Germany.

Tagliamonte, Sali & Shana Poplack

Tagliamonte, Sali & Shana Poplack. 1986. Past tense marking in Samaná English. NWAVE 15. Stanford University.

Tagliamonte, Sali & Shana Poplack. 1988. There’s no tense like the present: Verbal -s inflection in early Black English. NWAVE 17. Université de Montréal.

Tagliamonte, Sali & Shana Poplack. 1991. The unmarked verb: testing the creole hypothesis. NWAVE 20. Georgetown University.

Tagliamonte, Sali & Shana Poplack. 1991. Black English in Nova Scotia: the quest for the vernacular. APLA 15. University College of Cape Breton.

Tagliamonte, Sali & Shana Poplack. 1992. Linguistic characteristics of Afro-Nova Scotian isolates. SPCL 1992. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Tagliamonte, Sali & Shana Poplack. 1993. “They talks with grammar, with -s” Phono-prosodic vs. morpho-syntactic influences on word-final -s variability in African Nova Scotian English. NWAVE 22. University of Ottawa.

Tagliamonte, Sali & Shana Poplack. 1995. The synchrony of obsolescence: evidence from the PERFECT in African Nova Scotian English. ADS Annual Meeting. Chicago.

Tagliamonte, Sali, Shana Poplack & Ejike Eze

Tagliamonte, Sali, Shana Poplack & Ejike Eze. 1994. Exposing the substrate: plural marking patterns in Nigerian Pidgin English. NWAVE 23. Stanford University.

Tagliamonte, Sali, Shana Poplack & Ejike Eze. 1994. At time na bread, at times na cake” Pluralization in Nigerian Pidgin English. SPCL 1994. New Orleans.

Tagliamonte, Sali, Shana Poplack & Ejike Eze. 1996. Nigerian Pidgin English don: Perfect or what? SPCL 1996. San Diego.

Tagliamonte, Sali & Jennifer Smith

Tagliamonte, Sali & Jennifer Smith. 1997. Patterns of regularization in Samaná English: the case of was and were. SPCL 1997. London, UK.

Van Herk, Gerard

Van Herk, Gerard. 1997. Inversion in Samaná English question formation. NWAVE 26. Université Laval.

Van Herk, Gerard. 1997. On the question of questions in Samaná English. NWAVE 26 (Symposium on Objectivity and Commitment in the Study of Early Black English). Université Laval.

Van Herk, Gerard. 1998. Auxiliary verbs in Samaná English questions: non-inversion, deletion, and variable rules. SCL 12. St. Lucia, West Indies.

Van Herk, Gerard. 1998. Don’t know much about history: letting the data set the agenda in the origins-of-AAVE debate. NWAVE 27. University of Georgia, Athens.

Van Herk, Gerard. 1998. Auxiliary verbs in early African American Vernacular English questions. Non-inversion, deletion, and inherent variability. CLA 1998. University of Ottawa.

Van Herk, Gerard. 1998. Inversion in Early AAVE question formation. SPCL 1997. New York.

Van Herk, Gerard. 1999. “Safe Arived” the perfect in Early African American English letters. NWAVE 28. University of Toronto.

Van Herk, Gerard. 1999. “We was very much Oppress” 18th-century AAVE texts and the origins debate. SPCL 1999. University of California, Los Angeles.

Van Herk, Gerard. 1999. “Ain’t-shaped holes” and Standard English that isn’t: negation and literacy in Early African American English letters. Methods X. Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Van Herk, Gerard. 2000. “Them ain’t talking to me” lectal range in Barbados. SPCL 2000. Chicago.

Van Herk, Gerard. 2002. Letter perfect: genre and the present perfect in Early African American English. NWAV 31. Stanford University.

Van Herk, Gerard. 2002. The present perfect in Early African American correspondence. CLA 2002. University of Toronto.

Van Herk, Gerard. 2004. Getting past participles to function: /t,d/ in Early African American English (AAE). NWAV 33. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Van Herk, Gerard. 2004. Regional variation in 19th-century African American English. LAVIS III. University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa.

Van Herk, Gerard. 2005. Slave vs. free: linguistic consequences? CLA 2005. University of Western Ontario, London.

Van Herk, Gerard. 2005. Letters from West Africa. Memory and the African Diaspora. Toronto.

Van Herk, Gerard & Shana Poplack

Van Herk, Gerard & Shana Poplack. 2001. Rewriting the past: Zero marked verbs in Early African American Letters. NWAV 30. North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.

Van Herk, Gerard & James A. Walker

Van Herk, Gerard & James A. Walker. 2000. “Since my Last, things has Takeing quite an other aspect” verbal -s in Early Liberian settler English. ADS Annual Meeting. Chicago.

Walker, James A.

Walker, James A. 1995. The (r)-ful truth about African Nova Scotian English. NWAVE 24. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Walker, James A. 1997. Method in the madness of the copula. NWAVE 26 (Symposium on Objectivity and Commitment in the Study of Early Black English). Université Laval.

Walker, James A. 1997. Rephrasing the copula: contracted and zero copula in African Nova Scotian English. NWAVE 26. Université Laval.

Walker, James A. 1998. Beyond zero copula: evidence from early African American English. SPCL 1998. New York, NY.

Walker, James A. 1999. The progressive’s progress: a view from the present in Early African American English. NWAVE 28. University of Toronto.

Walker, James A. 1999. Prosodic variation and change in English auxiliaries. DGfS (Workshop on “Change in prosodic systems”). Universität Konstanz, Germany.

Walker, James A. 1999. “The Americans are Smart Industours hardy people & fears Nothing” verbal -s on the eve of the American Revolution. Methods X (panelist, Special session on accountability in reconstructing verbal -s). Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Walker, James A. 1999. Using the past to explain the present: tense and temporal reference in Early African American English. Methods X. Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Walker, James A. 2001. Before you say -s: grammatical and prosodic constraints in Early African American English. NWAV 30. North Carolina State University.

Walker, James A. 2001. Ain’t misbehavin’? Not-contraction in Early African American English. ADS Annual Meeting. Washington, D.C.

Walker, James A. 2001. The ain’t constraint and Early African American English. UKLVC3. University of York.

Walker, James A. 2003. Contextualizing variable concord: evidence from Early African American English. the University of Ulster.

Walker, James A. & Gerard Van Herk

Walker, James A. & Gerard Van Herk. 2002. “We Labors under a great deal of disadvantiges” verbal -s in Early African American English. CLA 2002. University of Toronto.